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Benefit Coverage Since 1979

Benefit Coverage Since 1979

This table and 6 charts show how — amidst some fluctuations, stability, and isolated increases — a widespread pattern of decline in the coverage or participation rates for the most common types of benefits. In cases of declines, most of it occurred from the mid-1990s to about 2000.

TO SEE IT, CLICK "DOWNLOAD NOW" ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THIS SCREEN.

Holiday and vacation pay, once universal among larger establishments and paid for about 85 percent or more of employees working for small establishments, is now less common. Despite the addition of the MLK holiday, employees now on average have 2 fewer holidays than in the 1980s, although this has been partly counterbalanced by a rise in vacation leave of about 2 days for those who reach a year of service. Retirement plan and life insurance coverage have also fallen. Although the pattern is not as consistent, dental and vision care coverage is now less than the peaks reached in the 1980s.

Until FDR’s New Deal and especially the post-World War II period, employee benefits made up a tiny fraction of compensation packages for workers — less than 3 percent in the 1920s. Currently, benefits account for 30 and 35 percent of compensation costs for private sector and state and local government employees, respectively.

These data are from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Employee Benefit Surveys (which since 1999 has been collected through the National Compensation Survey).

Note: employer-based health insurance is not included here, because it is separately presented in Employer-Based Health Insurance for Workers.

Posted On :

07/22/13 07:11PM

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991

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255

SKILL GAPS SKILL SHORTAGES AND SKILL MISMATCHES - EVIDENCE FOR THE U.S.

A new working paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research provides the results of Peter Cappelli’s research on skill gaps, skills shortages and skill mismatches. Cappelli examines the evidence that has been presented in favor of the skills shortages argument and complaints about skills are driving much of the debate around labor force and education policy. Mr. Cappelli examines the range of these charges as well as other evidence about skills in the labor force. The paper suggest that there is very little evidence consistent with the complaints about skills and a wide range of evidence suggesting that they are not true. The research paper considers three possible explanations for the employer complaints as well as the implications associated with those changes. You can view the article at http://www.nber.org/papers/w20382 This report is also feature on the LMI Community of Practice at https://winwin.workforce3one.org/view/SKILL_GAPS_SKILL_SHORTAGES_AND_SKILL_MISMATCHES_EV/info

Posted On :

08/28/14 03:38PM

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3420

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1978

Census Bureau's 2012 Local Employment Dynamics Partnership Workshop Presentations

The Census Bureau convenes an annual workshop with state partners, federal agencies, and public and private organizations with shared interest in the first quarter of every calendar year. The purpose of the annual workshop is to review progress, showcase use of data and analyses, solicit input and ideas, explore new concepts and uses, and discuss research and development directions for the coming years

Posted On :

03/21/12 04:58PM

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1594

SKILL GAPS, SKILL SHORTAGES AND SKILL MISMATCHES: EVIDENCE FOR THE U.S.

A New Working Paper from the NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH by Peter Cappelli Wharton School, Center for Human Resources

Posted On :

08/27/14 11:14AM

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3015

Oregon’s Hard to Fill Vacancies

Oregon’s Employment Dept. issued an analysis of its first job vacancy survey question on whether each job opening was “difficult to fill.” Employers described nearly half (44 percent) of the job openings available in Fall 2012 as difficult to fill.

Posted On :

08/01/13 09:58AM

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721

College Degree Needed?

A new Gallup poll found that two-fifths of workers with a Bachelor’s degree only don't believe that their job requires a Bachelor’s or more advanced degree, and 37 percent of those earning $75,000 or more annually concurred. Even 33 percent of the executive/managerial/professional respondents agreed.

Posted On :

09/10/13 04:14PM

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716

Geographical Mobility: 2012 to 2013

The U.S. Census Bureau has issued its annual set of 28 tables on how many Americans moved between 2012 and 2013 — the propensity to move declined slightly to 11.7 percent, vs. 12.0 percent between 2011 and 2012, returning to the levels of 2010 to 2011. Because Americans are more prone to move than the residents of many other countries, understanding mobility patterns is extremely important in economic development, labor market, education, and transportation planning.

Posted On :

11/18/13 01:02PM

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1125

Health Care Workforce Projections

HHS's National Center for Health Workforce Analysis is scheduled to release various types of projections in late 2013 and 2014, but has many useful materials available now. We've just added a link to a November 2013 conference on Redesigning The Health Care Workforce.

Posted On :

11/22/13 06:20PM

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1637

2022 BLS Employment Projections

2022 BLS Employment Projections

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) will on December 19, 2013 issue its employment projections for 2022 (using 2012 as the base year). BLS issues these national-level projections — the agency’s most sought-after data other than unemployment rates — every two years.

When released, these data will be available at the BLS Homepage.

For the most recent national projections (to 2020) see the BLS Employment Projections Homepage. For state occupational projections (a project funded by the U.S. Employment and Training Administration), see Projections Central.

Posted On :

11/15/13 11:53AM

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499

BLS Webinars on Compensation

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) staff recently conducted 3 Webinars through HRcom on how to obtain BLS wage and benefit information. These Webinars can be obtained for free by registering on the HRcom Web site (membership is free). The 3 Webinars are 1. “The Morphing of Retirement Benefits — BLS Data Speak” 2. “Zooming in on Compensation Data: A Guide to BLS Data for Human Resources Professionals” 3. “Tracking Wage Changes — Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics” TO SEE INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO ACCESS THESE WEBINARS, DOUBLE-CLICK "DOWNLOAD NOW" ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THIS SCREEN.

Posted On :

09/11/12 05:42PM

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Views :

648

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456

Skills-Based Employment Projections System

Skills-Based Projections and Skills Transferability presented by Anthony Dais, Employment and Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. 11 slides.

Posted On :

03/28/11 07:48PM

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520

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210

Census Bureau Issues Equal Opportunity ACS Data

The U.S. Census Bureau will release its special Equal Employment Opportunity Tabulation. This tabulation is produced for the Federal agencies responsible for monitoring employment practices and enforcing civil rights laws in the workforce, and for employers so they can measure their compliance with civil right laws and regulations. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Department of Justice, Department of Labor and the Office of Personnel Management sponsored this tabulation. Previous tabulations were made available every decennial census since 1970. However, this tabulation uses five years of data collected (2006-2010) from the American Community Survey (ACS). The latest tabulation highlights the diversity of the labor force (by sex, race, and ethnicity) across several variables, including detailed occupations, industry, earnings, education, citizenship, employment status, age, residence and worksite geographies for the nation, states, metropolitan areas, counties and places. Selected tables will also include county-to-county commuting flows. When released, this data can be accessed at the Census Bureau Newsroom.

Posted On :

11/23/12 10:32AM

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Views :

435