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12th Grade Math and Reading Scores Unchanged from 2009 to 2013

Posted by LMI Win-Win Network - On May 08, 2014 (EST)

12th Grade Math and Reading Scores Unchanged from 2009 to 2013

The U.S. National Center for Education Statistics has issued its latest analysis of reading and math test results for 12th graders for 2013, from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP, sometimes popularly referred to as “The Nation’s Report Card”). Comparing 2013 with the previous 2009 tests, overall average scores were identical in each subject. A separate NAEP test of 17 year-olds (most of whom were high school juniors) similarly showed steady overall average scores between the two most recent test years (2008 and 2012). For seniors, the tests have been comparable in reading since 1992, but only since 2005 in math. NAEP scales scores differently between the two subjects, with reading using a 500-point scale and math using a 300-point scale. For public school students only, NAEP also reported state-level test scores for 13 states (AR, CT, FL, ID, IL, IA, MA, MI, NH, NJ, SD, TN and WV).

Demographic and Disability Trends The high school population continues to show a rapid rise in the proportion of Hispanic 12th graders (from 7 percent in 1992 to 14 percent in 2005 to 20 percent in 2013), with a corresponding fall in White high school seniors from 74 to 58 percent from 1992 to 2013 (with little change among African American, Asian American, and Native American seniors). Students with disabilities rose slightly from 7 percent to 9 percent of 12th graders between 2005 and 2013 (the earliest and latest available years). Interestingly, despite the growth in the share of Hispanic seniors, the proportion of English-language learners fell from 4 to 3 percent between 2005 and 2013. All of the foregoing changes were statistically significant (hereafter denoted as “significant”).

Trends Common to Math and Reading Scores. Not only average scores, but scores at various percentile ranges (i.e., both high and low scores) were virtually unchanged between 2009 and 2013.

Reading Scores.  For the 8 comparable reading tests given between 1992 and 2013, average scores have fluctuated with no clear pattern, falling by 4 points over the entire span (292 to 288), with 1992 being the peak and 2005’s 286 representing the lowest score (the 2013 scores are significantly higher than those in 2005). The biggest score gaps in 2013 were between English-language learners and those who were not (237 vs. 290, respectively); students with and without disabilities (252 vs. 292, respectively); those with parents who didn’t finish high school and those who graduated from college (270 vs. 299, respectively); and African Americans and Whites (268 vs. 297, respectively). The smallest differences were between city and suburban seniors (285 vs. 291, respectively), and between boys and girls (284 vs. 293, respectively). Among demographic and other groups, there were only three changes of more than 3 points for seniors between 2009 and 2013, and none of these were significant: declines among Native Americans (from 283 to 277) and English-language learners (240 to 237), and an increase from 286 to 289 among rural seniors. 

Math Scores. The national average score in 2013 was 153, identical with that of 2009 but significantly higher than the 2005's score of 150 (the earliest comparable year).  The biggest score gaps in 2013 were between English-language learners and those who were not (109 vs. 155, respectively); African Americans and Asian Americans (132 vs. 172, respectively); students with and without disabilities (119 vs. 157, respectively); and those with parents who didn’t finish high school and those who graduated from college (137 vs. 164, respectively). The smallest differences were between boys and girls (155 vs. 152, respectively — the reverse of the pattern for reading scores), and city and suburban seniors (149 vs. 158, respectively). Among demographic and other groups for whom data are available since 2005, the most steady trend has been the increase in the scores of Hispanics from 133 to 138 to 141 in 2005, 2009 and 2013, respectively (although the change between the latter two years was not significant). In contrast, scores among English-language learners fell from 120 to 117 to 109 in 2005, 2009 and 2013, respectively (although the change between the latter two years was not significant).

State Highlights. For public school seniors only, 2013 reading scores ranged in the 13 available states from WV’s 280 (little changed from 2009) to NH’s 295 (up 2 points from 2009), with the overall public school average at 287. In math, scores ranged from 145 in TN (no 2009 scores available) and WV (up 4 points from 2009) to 161 in NH (little changed from 2009) and MA (down 2 points from 2009), with the overall public school average at 152.

Sources. See the 2013 Mathematics and Reading: Grade 12 Assessments Home page: for detailed and customized detailed data, see the links at the bottom of the screen. The most detailed one-stop locations for data can be found at these links for reading and math, including state-specific data. For an overview of the trends in reading and math for 17 year-olds, which are available since the early 1970s, see Four Decades of Reading and Math Scores.




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Modified On : May 08, 2014
Type : Thread
Viewed : 1279
In Relation : Educational Attainment, Achievement, Credentials, and Skills Data


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